Ferrari driver caught by Lincolnshire’s ‘most profitable’ speed camera takes his fight to court


A Ferrari driver is to challenge a £100 speeding ticket in court because he says the speed limit signs before the county’s most profitable speed camera are not clearly visible.

Stuart Shield, 63, was driving his bright yellow Ferrari 458 northbound along the A1 last summer when he was caught doing 57mph in the 50mph stretch through roadworks at Great Ponton west of Grantham.

The 50mph zone comes after a series of average speed cameras along a two-to-three mile section of the A1 which has a 70mph speed limit.

Mr Shield, a publisher who runs international hotel and property awards and lives in Essex, has pleaded not guilty to speeding and is to represent himself in a trial at Lincoln Magistrates’ Court in August.

Have you been caught by this speed camera?Have your say on this story in the comments here

To support his case, he submitted a request Freedom of Information Act request which showed 9,091 vehicles were caught exceeding the 50mph limit between June 1 and July 1, 2020.

Less than half this number were caught speeding in the southbound carriageway.

Stuart Shield’s car caught on camera

Daily traffic flow on the road is about 25,000 vehicles in each direction, making a total of 1.5million vehicles a month.

Mr Shield: “Both carriageways are busy with vehicles.

“There’s a large amount of lorries that concertina up and your view is blocked.

“There are three 50mph signs on the approach to the roadworks area but you cannot see a sign for half a mile at least.

“The signs on the 70mph stretch are much higher up on the posts and therefore easier to see.

“I race cars and I drive a Ferrari. They can go upwards of 200mph but I don’t.

“I do stick to speed restrictions. I simply was not speeding through that zone.

“I thought I was within the national speed limit.”

Mr Shield said the camera he was caught by is the UK’s highest earner at almost £1 million per month.

He added: “I think the authorities should be brought to book. Look at how much money they are making.

“But it’s not about making money, it’s about keeping people safe who are working on the road.

“The theory is to reduce speed so these people can work safely but I think there’s a failure to protect these people.”

Below is a table showing the number of speeding offences on the A1 northbound and southbound at Grantham each month:

A1 Grantham NB and SB

Jan-20

4,207

Feb-20

9,899

Mar-20

5,939

Apr-20

178

May-20

197

Jun-20

7,974

Jul-20

12,246

Aug-20

6,352

Sep-20

5,043

Oct-20

5,582

Nov-20

5,431

Dec-20

6,091

Jan-21

5,090

Feb-21

3,501

Mar-21

3,600

Michael Pace, partner and head of personal injury and motor law at Chattertons Solicitors in Lincoln, had a look at the camera for himself after he started to receive a lot of enquiries about it in January 2020.

He said that many people said they did not see any signs at all.

He said: “When you’re heading northbound it’s a confusing situation.

“Simply put in more warning signs. There’s nothing that says reduced speed limit ahead.

“There are roadworks ahead signs but that does not mean anything.

“It needs something further back that gives people more warning.

“With more than 9,000 people caught by this speed camera in one month, about half of those caught going south, the police should realise they have more people getting caught and therefore there’s a problem.

“So how is it being addressed?”

John Siddle, from Lincolnshire Road Safety Partnership (LRSP), said: “The temporary speed limit was implemented as a safety measure to protect the workforce and the public whilst the major roadworks are carried out and as part of that LRSP installed average speed cameras to enforce that speed limit at the request of Highways England.

“Whilst Covid-19 restrictions have decreased traffic flow, there is still a significant number of vehicles travelling through these roadworks, the overwhelming majority of which do so within the temporary 50mph speed limit.

“The camera systems at this location have two independent checking mechanisms that record the speed of a vehicle.

“The secondary speed measurement must match the primary record within a small variance or the system will not process the offence.

“In addition, a member of staff manually processes every offence, ensuring that all details are in order.

“Additionally, the camera and site are calibrated annually by the manufacturer.

“The history of the A1 cameras is one of a significant amount of collisions, injuries and death that have seen engineering solutions like Colsterworth roundabout and many smaller schemes that often go unnoticed by the road users to try to reduce these collisions.

“We will always seek an engineering solution however, where they are impracticable or cost-prohibitive we will use speed cameras as a last resort.”





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