Porsche rumored to be entering F1 with Red Bull Racing

SI202104180555 hires jpeg 24bit rgb 800x533
SI202104180555 hires jpeg 24bit rgb 800x533

Learn how to bring any battery back to life again

A blurry photo of a Red Bull Racing F1 car at speed
Enlarge / Red Bull is assuming control of its own engine development next year once Honda leaves the sport. But could we see Porsche badges on the cars before too long? The rumors won’t stop swirling.

Lars Baron/Getty Images

Even though we’re only two races in, this year’s Formula 1 season is already shaping up to be the most competitive in years. Thanks to the resurgent Red Bull Racing, Mercedes-AMG has a real fight on its hands for the first time since the introduction of hybrid powertrains in 2014.

Red Bull is in the final year of a partnership with Honda, and the Japanese OEM has pulled out all the stops in an effort to leave the sport with a little glory. Starting next year, Red Bull will take over the engine program from Honda, developing its own engines à la Mercedes-AMG, Ferrari, and Alpine. But could we see the energy-drink team partner with Porsche?

Rumors that Volkswagen Group is going to enter F1, either through its Porsche or Audi brands, are almost ever-present in the sport. Both Porsche and Audi scaled back their factory racing efforts as a result of dieselgate and then the pandemic, although both companies are planning to return to endurance racing at Le Mans and here in the US by 2023.

Representatives from VW Group have participated in discussions over future F1 engine rules, even though none of the company’s brands are involved in the sport. In late March, Audi flatly denied plans to enter F1, on the grounds of cost, but Porsche’s CEO was more cautiously optimistic, telling Car that participation was possible but that “the regulations need to change so that Porsche can broadly identify with the new environment-friendly priorities.”

Red Bull has said in the past that “nothing is fixed.” But the rumor mill will step up a notch after comments made in a press conference on Friday at this weekend’s Portuguese Grand Prix. This time, it was the Mercedes team boss, Toto Wolff, who threw some fuel on the fire.

Mercedes GP Executive Director Toto Wolff (L), Red Bull Racing Team Principal Christian Horner (M), and McLaren Chief Executive Officer Zak Brown (R) talk in the Team Principals Press Conference during practice ahead of the F1 Grand Prix of Portugal at Autodromo Internacional Do Algarve on April 30, 2021, in Portimao, Portugal.
Enlarge / Mercedes GP Executive Director Toto Wolff (L), Red Bull Racing Team Principal Christian Horner (M), and McLaren Chief Executive Officer Zak Brown (R) talk in the Team Principals Press Conference during practice ahead of the F1 Grand Prix of Portugal at Autodromo Internacional Do Algarve on April 30, 2021, in Portimao, Portugal.

Lars Baron/Getty Images

“I think the right strategic steps have been, as far as I can see, set in motion from Red Bull,” Wolff said. “I think they are going dual-track with their own power unit and maybe with a new OEM joining in, and that’s certainly intelligent, and the arrangement that has been found with Honda in carrying over the IP is also clever. And it’s clear that they’re going to hire English engineers because it’s [the engine program] in the United Kingdom and there are not a lot of companies that can probably provide those engineers. So absolutely understood what the strategy is.”

Later in the press conference, Red Bull’s team principal, Christian Horner, was asked whether the team’s setup gave it unique flexibility with regard to bringing in an OEM as an engine partner.

Red Bull could keep everything in-house and badge the engine as a Red Bull, or it could partner with an OEM that simply adds its badge (and budget) to the engine program. Or an OEM might partly or completely involve itself in the engineering and development.

“It’s a big challenge, but it’s an exciting challenge, and it’s one that we fully embrace,” Horner said. “I think, other than Ferrari, it makes us the only team to produce chassis and engines in-house and have a fully integrated solution between both technical teams, and that’s particularly exciting and attractive. We are assembling an exceptionally talented group of people together. And you know, we’re only at the beginning of that journey.”

But Horner stayed tight-lipped about adding a new car company’s brand to the sport.

“In terms of what will the engine be badged as, at this point in time, [it] is clearly focused to be a Red Bull engine,” Horner said. “That is a commitment and that is a design group that we’re bringing together to focus on the new regulations. We have effectively a soft landing thanks to the IP usage that we have a principle agreement with Honda, so it’s exciting times. And I think it puts Red Bull in a truly unique situation to have everything housed on one campus under one roof and to really make use of those synergies. And particularly in a cost-capped world with cost caps potentially coming into powertrains as well, it makes it achievable for companies such as our own.”

Learn how to bring any battery back to life again

Source link

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*