This is the ultimate 21st-century Porsche 911 restomod

Learn how to bring any battery back to life again

If you don’t want to wait for the real thing, Everrati will build a fully electric 911 for you.

Everrati Automotive Limited

If you don’t want to wait for the real thing, Everrati will build a fully electric 911 for you.

It was going to happen sooner or later – someone has ditched the flat-six and put some batteries and electric motors in a Porsche 911.

Everrati Automotive Limited pulled apart a 1991 964-generation Porsche 911 for its latest flagship project, removing its bodywork, powertrain, suspension and interior components, before water-blasting the chassis to its bare zinc coating.

Every 911 “redefined” by Everrati gets a special differential, 53kWh battery, heated front seats, a new audio system with bluetooth and Apple CarPlay support (no mention of Android Auto), custom Porsche-inspired gauges and upgraded brakes.

Buyers can choose from leather, Alcantara or Pepita cloth seats while a leather dash, steering wheel and door panels are also standard.

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Optional equipment includes better audio systems, alloy wheel upgrades, parking sensors and/or a reversing camera, an alarm/tracker combo, special paints and interior materials. There is also a Tractive adjustable suspension kit available, along with a display case for your original engine.

New dials are designed to look like official Porsche gauges, and really do look spectacular.

Everrati Automotive Limited

New dials are designed to look like official Porsche gauges, and really do look spectacular.

Going for the more expensive Signature widebody model adds a rear ducktail spoiler and a unique interior as standard (optional on the cheaper Pure).

If you want, the firm can also replace the original steel front and rear fenders and bonnet with carbon fibre parts, along with adding carbon fibre doors reinforced with high-strength steel, and a CF roof – but only if your 964 doesn’t have a sunroof, for some reason.

Even more weird is the option of an “active sound performance exhaust” which seems to add fake exhaust tips to the rear bumper. The sporty sound is good, but the exhaust part feels like it’s admitting the EV conversion isn’t as good or fun as the combustion engine.

Power ranges up to 372kW/500Nm, enough to hit 100kmh in around four seconds.

Everrati Automotive Limited

Power ranges up to 372kW/500Nm, enough to hit 100kmh in around four seconds.

Power for the Pure sits at 328kW/460Nm while the Signature pushes things to 372kW with the optional Performance Pack. Range is 290km and 241km for each model, respectively.

Everrati claims a 0-60mph (0-97kmh) sprint of 4.5 seconds for Pure conversions and “sub-four seconds” for Signature. Quite an improvement over the original 964s figures of 184kW/310Nm and 5.5 seconds to 60mph with a manual transmission.

Price? Hope you’re sitting down because Everrati is asking £250,000 (NZ$489,675) for the Signature conversion alone, before options. You still need to provide a donor car. Going for the Pure is a bit more reasonable, but also not really – it starts at £200,000 (NZ$391,740), plus the car.

Learn how to bring any battery back to life again

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